Synthetic Cannabinoids: Illegal and Dangerous

 BALTIMORE (August 28, 2012) – The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) advises Marylanders that a large number of Synthetic Cannabinoids, known by a variety of names such as “Spice” and “K2,” have been recently added to the federal list of Schedule 1 Controlled Substances. State and local health officials have long expressed concern about these products, which are marijuana-like synthetic compounds linked to potentially severe adverse reactions and abuse.
So far in 2012, the Maryland Poison Control has received 159 calls related to the use of Synthetic Cannabinoids, compared to a total of 151 calls in 2011.  More than half of the calls involved individuals age 19 or younger, and the calls have come from 20 of Maryland’s 24 counties.  Four involved admission to an Intensive Care Unit.

“Whether sold on the street or at a convenience store, synthetic cannabinoids pose a threat,” said Frances B. Phillips, Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services.  “This is another important topic for parents to discuss with their adolescents in order to protect their health.”

In January 2012, following a public comment period, the Department supported legislation to ban the sale of synthetic cannabinoids in Maryland. The recent federal action accomplishes this goal for Maryland and other states. 

Now that the sale of these products is illegal under federal law, the Department urges retailers to remove them from their shelves.

For more information: DEA: Nationwide Synthetic Drug Takedown
http://www.justice.gov/dea/pubs/pressrel/pr072612.html

FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin: Synthetic Marijuana 
http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/law-enforcement-bulletin/may-2012/synthetic-marijuana/
 

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WCHD News

As part of Pocomoke City’s 4th Friday on Sept. 27, the Worcester County Health Department will lead a free 1-mile fun walk through the historic downtown district. Registration begins at 5 pm and the walk starts at 5:30 pm.

Click the image below to register for the walk. 

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The Out of the Darkness Suicide Awareness Walk. Movement of a quarter of a million people joined by local participants in Ocean City, MD.

Ocean City, MD − Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, yet suicide can be prevented. Volunteers from Worcester County are joining the quarter of a million people who are walking in towns across the United States to draw attention to the fight for suicide prevention. The 8th annual Out of the Darkness Walk, hosted by the Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) will be held on Saturday, September 21, 2019. As in years past, walkers will gather at Caroline Street and the Boardwalk, with registration beginning at 9am. After opening remarks, the procession will walk to the Inlet, turn and walk to 5th Street, then back to Caroline Street.

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Worcester Health partners with Ocean City Fire Department on “Safe Station” project
Station offers 24/7 access to recovery services

Ocean City, MD- Where would you go if you needed help with addiction right now? The Worcester County Health Department, in partnership with the Town of Ocean City Fire Department, has launched a “Safe Station” in Ocean City at the 15th Street Fire Station for those seeking immediate help getting into recovery. The station is open 24-hours a day, 7 days a week for any individuals seeking treatment services.

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In the event of a storm or power outage, it is important to know safety information about food storage and operating generators. Follow the links below for tips about food and generator safety.

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(July 31, 2019 Snow Hill, MD) – The Worcester County Health Department received notification from the State of Maryland that a mosquito pool in the Whaleyville area of Worcester County recently tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). This is the first positive test for EEE in Worcester in 2019.

Arboviruses, such as the EEE virus, are most common during the summer and fall months. The viruses are transmitted by infected mosquitoes and spread to humans, birds, horses and other animals. Since mosquitoes can breed in as little as a quarter inch of water, eliminating standing water is critical for the control of mosquito populations. Many factors impact when and where outbreaks occur, such as weather, numbers of mosquitoes that spread the virus, and human behavior.

The Worcester and Wicomico County Health Department provides the following tips to help prevent contact with mosquitoes and reduce risk of infection with EEE or other mosquito borne illnesses:

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