Worcester County Core Service Agency PDF Print E-mail

The Core Service Agencies (CSAs) are the local mental health authorities responsible for planning, managing, and monitoring public mental health services at the local level. CSAs exist under the authority of the Secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and also are agents of the county government, which approve their organizational structure.
The functions of core service agencies are to plan, develop, and manage a full range of treatment and rehabilitation services for persons with serious mental illness in their jurisdiction as stipulated by the Health General Article, 10-10-1203, Annotated Code of Maryland.

 


Programs

Homeless ID Project
SSI/SSDI Outreach Access and Recovery (SOAR)

 


Purpose

Provide leadership and accountability in Worcester County for the establishment of a diverse, comprehensive and accessible array of quality mental health services responsive to the needs and desires of citizens with mental illness, their families and service providers.  Identify trends and service needs and to promote prevention, outreach, education, referral, advocacy and service delivery through collaboration with the community.
 


Mission


The mission of the Worcester County Core Service Agency is to ensure that people of all ages experiencing mental illness can better manage their illness; achieve their personal goals; and live, work, and participate in their community.

 

Vision

To have a comprehensive, effective and responsive service delivery system that assists consumers in achieving optimum wellness and recovery. 


Shared Values

The Worcester County CSA is committed to take actions consistent with the following fundamental values of the Mental Hygiene Administration and the Public Mental Health System:

  1. Basic Personal Rights: Consumers have the right to choice, to retain the fullest possible control over their own lives, and to have opportunities to be involved in their communities.

  2. Responsive System: The Public Mental Health System must be responsive to the people it serves, coherently organized, and accessible to those individuals needing mental health care.

  3. Empowerment: Consumers and families will be involved in decision-making processes, individually at the treatment level and collectively in the planning and operational aspects of the mental health system.

  4. Family and Community Support: We must provide families with the assistance they need in order to maintain or enhance the support they give to their family members.

  5. Least Restrictive Setting: An array of services will be available throughout the state to meet a variety of consumer needs. These services should be provided in the least restrictive, most normative, and most appropriate setting.

  6. Working Collaboratively: Collaborations with other agencies at the state and local level will be fostered so support to consumers is inclusive of all activities of life.

  7. Effective Management and Accountability: Accountability is essential to consistently provide an acceptable level of mental health services. Essential management functions include monitoring and self-evaluation, responding rapidly to identified weaknesses in the system, adapting to changing needs, and improving technology.

  8. Local Governance: Local management of resources will improve continuity of care, provide needed services in a timely manner, and improve the congruence of services and resources with needs, and increase economic efficiency due to the closer proximity of the service delivery level.

  9. Staff Resources: The presence of a competent and committed staff is essential for the provision of an acceptable level of mental health services.

  10. Community Education: Early identification and prevention activities for risk groups of all ages, public education, and efforts that support families and communities must be incorporated into our service system. Increased acceptance and support for mental health services comes from increased awareness and understanding of psychiatric disorders and treatment options. 

 

 



CSA Contracts

The CSA is not a service provider but contracts for services with various providers in the area. Funds primarily come from MHA, but can be obtained through other grants or federal block grants.

Additional Responsibilities

The CSA manages Shelter plus Care and Projects in Assisting with Transitioning from Homelessness (PATH). Both are federally funded programs targeting the homeless. Additionally, the CSA manages a fund of money provided by MHA which can pay for goods/services for a person in the public mental health system.  These goods/services should help the individual remain stable in the community.


Forms

Application for Residential Rehabilitation Services
RRP DSM-5 Priority Population-Substance Use Disorder List
RRP Application Instructions

Request for Laboratory Services

Request for Financial Assistance to Purchase Medication
Request for Financial Assistance to Pay for Rent/Utilities
Request for Financial Assistance to Pay for Transportation

Projects for Assistance in Transitioning from Homelessness (PATH) Intake Form

Mental Health Case Management Referral Form


 

Last Updated on Friday, 01 August 2014 12:42
 

WCHD News

Salisbury, MD. – Dorchester, Somerset, Sussex, Wicomico and Worcester counties invite 
the public to Emergency Preparedness Night on August 23rd at Arthur W. Perdue Stadium.
 
The Delmarva Shorebirds will play against the Asheville Tourists at 7:05 p.m.
Representatives from local health departments, emergency management agencies, and 
volunteer organizations will host exhibit booths promoting emergency preparedness 
before and during the baseball game. 
 
Come out to the ballpark to support the Shorebirds and learn how you can be better 
prepared for life’s curve balls. 
 
The event is co-sponsored by the health departments and emergency management offices 
of Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester Counties, Ocean City and the Maryland
and Delaware Offices of Emergency Management. 
 
Snow Hill, Maryland- August 1, 2014.  Get fit, lose weight, and improve your health with certified lifestyle coaches through group sessions beginning August 25th in Snow Hill.  The Lifestyle Balance Program is a year-long, healthy eating, physical activity, and weight loss program that has been proven effective in reducing the risk for type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases, assisting in weight loss and maintenance of a healthy body weight, and decreasing the risk for heart disease and stroke.  
Read more...
 
Baltimore, MD (August 11, 2014) --State and local officials have been working since last year to prepare Maryland parents and schools for new school immunization requirements for students entering kindergarten and 7th grade this fall.  All kindergartners must have had two chickenpox (varicella) vaccinations.  All 7th graders must receive a pertussis booster (Tdap) and dose of meningitis vaccines.  School officials and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) are urging parents to make sure their child is appropriately immunized against these diseases prior to the start of school.  Children may be excluded from school if they do not have these vaccinations.
“We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,"  said Dr. Laura Herrera, Deputy Secretary for DHMH Public Health Services.  "We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.”
Immunizations are one of public health’s greatest triumphs.  With the exception of safe water, no other health strategy-- not even the creation of antibiotics--has had such a tremendous effect on reducing disease.  Despite the availability of safe and effective immunizations, thousands of cases of vaccine-preventable diseases occur in the United States every year.  Consider the following facts about varicella, pertussis and meningitis: 
 
Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease that can be spread before a person knows they have the disease.
Chickenpox can lead to serious complications, including pneumonia and brain damage.
One out of five people who get meningococcal meningitis experience serious complications, such as the loss of limb(s), permanent hearing loss, or mental impairment.
In recent years, adolescents (11-18 yrs) and adults (19 yrs and older) have accounted for an increasing proportion of pertussis cases. 
Infants who are at highest risk for complications and death due to pertussis are often infected by older siblings, parents or caregivers who might not even know they have the disease.
 
In preparation for the new requirements, local health departments are holding special back-to-school clinics throughout the state.  Parents should call their doctor or local health department to learn if their child needs any of the school-required vaccinations and make arrangements to receive the missing vaccines so their child will not be excluded from school.
 


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