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Worcester County, MD Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information 2020

This website provides up-to-date in4formation about the Worcester County Health Department's response to the COVID-19 public health emergency. For more information on Coronavirus in Maryland, call 2-1-1.

Maryland COVID-19 Case Count

Last updated on this site May 28, 2020 10:30 am. Note this data is retroactive to the day before. 

The data below was last updated May 28, 2020 at 10:30 am based on the latest available data from coronavirus.jhu.edu & coronavirus.maryland.gov. 

For questions regarding Coronavirus (COVID-19), callers can reach the center between 8 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday, by dialing 410-632-1100 option #8. General information on COVID-19 is available 24/7 through Worcester Health’s Public Information Line (410-632-4321) and WorcesterHealth.org.

Update 5/15/20:

SAFER AT HOME: On May 13th, Governor Larry Hogan announced the beginning of Stage One of the ‘Maryland
Strong: Roadmap to Recovery,’ which includes moving from a Stay at Home order to a Safer at Home public health advisory and the gradual reopenings of retail, manufacturing, houses of worship, and some personal services. Effective Friday, May 15, at 5:00 pm, Maryland will move from a Stay at Home order to a Safer at Home public health advisory.

Marylanders, particularly older and more vulnerable Marylanders, are strongly advised to continue staying home as much as possible. Employers should continue to encourage telework for their employees when possible. Individuals who can work from home should continue to do so. Maryland citizens should continue wearing masks in indoor public areas, retail stores, and on public transportation. The Reopening of Certain Businesses and Facilities order is available at https://governor.maryland.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Gatherings-SIXTH-AMENDED-5.13.2
0.pdf

Up-to-date information about the Hogan administration’s ongoing response to COVID-19 is available at https://governor.maryland.gov/coronavirus/.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a respiratory virus. This is a virus that hasn’t caused illness in humans before. COVID-19 is spread just like colds or flu through coughing and sneezing, which creates respiratory droplets, close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands, or touching an object or surface with the virus on it. 

Symptoms of COVID-19 include:

  • Fever
  • Coughing
  • Shortness of breath
  • In more severe cases, pneumonia (infection in the lungs)

Individual risk is dependent on exposure. Current risk assessment:

  • People in communities where ongoing community spread with the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated, though still relatively low risk of exposure.
  • Healthcare workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Close contacts of persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Travelers returning from affected international locations where community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • If you are sick, call your provider to discuss your symptoms before you walk-in to a doctor's office.

For people who are ill with diagnosed COVID-19 or seasonal influenza, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others. Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others. You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick. Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities. Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected. Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker. Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

What You Can Do to Protect from Infectious Disease?

It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season and CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine, taking everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed. Preventing viral respiratory infections. Protect yourself from getting sick.

How can I protect myself from COVID-19? 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home while you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with others.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces.

How do I get tested for Coronavirus?

If you develop symptoms such as fever, cough, and/or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or have recently traveled from an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19, stay home and call your healthcare provider. Your doctor will determine if you have signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and whether you should be tested. If you do not have a primary care provider or symptoms worsen contact your local emergency room.

High-Risk Conditions

COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

  • People aged 65 years and older.
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility.
  • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma.
  • People who have heart disease with complications.
  • People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment.
  • People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index [(BM]I)≥40) or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk.
  • People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk.

Where can I go for more information?

The Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) has a call center operating Monday through Friday from 8 am to 5 pm with staff available to answer questions. To reach the center call 410-632-1100 option #8. WCHD also operates an automated public information line 24/7 with messaging about COVID-19 (410-632-4321). Visit WorcesterHealth.org for up-to-date facts and information on COVID-19 locally. Follow @WorcesterHealth on Facebook and other social media for emerging updates.

COVID-19 Public Health Activities

What Businesses and Governments Can do to Prepare

Ways to cope with stress

Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.

 

Recovery and Wellness Support Resources for the COVID-19 Outbreak

The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) continues to develop coordinated prevention and response plans for COVID-19. BHA will provide COVID19 updates as they become available and accurate information for behavioral health providers, partners, and the greater community. 

For the latest COVID-19 information and resources, visit the BHA website or coronavirus.maryland.gov. For additional questions or concerns, contact
your Local Behavioral Health Authority.

 

     Contact:
 Environmental Health Program
 Isle of Wight Center
 
 Phone: 410-352-3234
 
 Hours: 8 am to 4:30 pm

altThe Environmental Health Program investigates bed bug infestations in hotels and in commercial properties,  private residences are excluded. 

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